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Thom Dunn is a Boston-based writer, musician, homebrewer, and new media artist. He enjoys Oxford commas, metaphysics, and romantic clichés (especially when they involve whiskey), and he firmly believes that Journey's "Don't Stop Believing" is the single greatest atrocity committed against mankind. He is a graduate of Clarion Writer's Workshop at UCSD ('13) & Emerson College ('08).

EPIC THEMES (and...some other stuff over there)

Jonathan Hickman is a comic book writer who has mostly taken over the two main AVENGERS books, and has also published a number of highly acclaimed creator-owned books that took remarkably innovative approaches to graphic narratives. But as much as I've enjoyed most of his work (especially his Secret Warriors which is one of my favorite Marvel series in recent years), I've noticed something...off...about his story telling (Red Mass For Mars and The Red Wing in particular both start off really cool and then...don't really go anywhere). Over at Tor.com, I've provided a detailed analysis of this strange narrative voice, but what it comes down to is that Hickman likes to explicitly tell his readers about his huge, epic, sweeping themes using marvelous spectacle and narrative devices. Then he finds a plot that works as an excuse for him to tell you about these themes and use these spectacles, and fills the plot in with characters, 'cause I guess you need those, too. And the theatre professional in me realized that this flies right in the face of Aristotle's POETICS, which have long formed the basis for our understanding of Western dramatic storytelling.

I'll let the rest of the article speak for itself:

"The Strange Poetics of Jonathan Hickman" on Tor Dot Com